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Lot 1
(ALASKA.) William Healey Dall.
An extremely detailed letter from the Alaskan wilderness in the year of the Alaska Purchase.

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Lot 2
(AMERICAN INDIANS.) John Raphael Smith, engraver; after Wright.
The Widow of an Indian Chief Watching the Arms of Her Deceas'd Husband.

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Lot 3
(AMERICAN INDIANS.) William Webb.
Letter describing the Creek War of 1836.

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Lot 4
(AMERICAN INDIANS.) George Jones.
The History of Ancient America . . . Proving the Identity of the Aborigines with the Tyrians

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Lot 5
(AMERICAN INDIANS.) Thomas McKenney and James Hall.
History of the Indian Tribes of North America.

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Lot 6
(AMERICAN INDIANS.) Samuel George Morton.
Crania Americana; or, A Comparative View of the Skulls of Various Aboriginal Nations of North and South America.

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Lot 7
(AMERICAN INDIANS.) William A. Phillips.
Defense of the Cherokee Nation's right to sell land in Kansas.

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Lot 8
(AMERICAN INDIANS.) John Ross.
Message of the Principal Chief to the National Committee and Council.

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Lot 9
(AMERICAN INDIANS.)
Papers of Joshua Ross, a Muskogee merchant and prominent Cherokee.

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Lot 10
(AMERICAN INDIANS.) John P. Williamson, compiler.
An English-Dakota School Dictionary. Wasicun Qa Dakota Ieska Wowapi.

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Lot 11
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) David F. Barry.
Group of 5 photographs including Sitting Bull at the dedication of Standing Rock.

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Lot 12
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) Edward S. Curtis.
Unpublished cyanotype of five men in a Piegan lodge.

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Lot 13
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) Camillus S. Fly, photographer.
The Captive White Boy, Santiago McKinn.

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Lot 14
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) Camillus S. Fly, photographer.
Geronimo and Natches Mounted.

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Lot 15
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) [Alexander Gardner.]
Cabinet card portrait of Thrach-Tche, or True Eagle, Missouria.

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Lot 16
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) De Lancey Gill, photographer.
Portrait of the Oglala leader White Mountain.

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Lot 17
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) John C. Grabill, photographer.
A Pretty Group at an Indian Tent.

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Lot 18
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) Harold Kellogg.
Buffalo dancers and others at San Ildefonso Pueblo in New Mexico.

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Lot 19
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) Lenny & Sawyers, photographers
Pair of boudoir cards of Kiowa women.

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Lot 20
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) [George E. Trager].
Pair of promenade cards of the Ghost Dance at Pine Ridge.

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Lot 21
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.) William Soule.
Indian Lodges of Buffalo Skins & Cedar Poles.

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Lot 22
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.)
Group of 11 cartes-de-visite, tintypes, cabinet cards, and stereoviews.

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Lot 23
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.)
Group of 7 unmounted photographs.

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Lot 24
(AMERICAN INDIANS--PHOTOGRAPHS.)
Group of 9 mostly larger-format mounted images.

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Lot 25
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--PRELUDE.)
Opposition to the Stamp Act as seen in the letterbook of a New York iron merchant.

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Lot 26
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--PRELUDE.) [Philip Dawe, artist.]
Bostonian's Paying the Excise Man, or Tarring & Feathering.

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Lot 27
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--PRELUDE.) [Stratton]; after Paul Revere.
The Bloody Massacre Perpetrated in King-Street, Boston.

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Lot 28
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1775.) St. John Honeywood, artist.
The Battles of Lexington and Concord, after the famous engravings by Doolittle.

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Lot 29
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION.) James Mitan, engraver; after Trumbull.
The Battle of Bunker's Hill, near Boston.

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Lot 30
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1776.) [Matthew & Mary Darly], artists.
Bunkers Hill, or America's Head Dress.

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Lot 31
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1776.) Abraham W. de Peyster.
Letter describing the deadly lightning storm just before the Battle of Long Island.

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Lot 32
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1777.)
Issue of the Boston-Gazette and Country Journal.

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Lot 33
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1777.) Jeremiah Beard Eells.
Diary of a Connecticut officer imprisoned in the infamous Manhattan sugarhouse.

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Lot 34
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1778.)
Receipt for blankets for Connecticut troops at Valley Forge.

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Lot 35
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1778.) Joseph Woodbridge.
Letter discussing the perils of shipping along the heavily patrolled Connecticut coast.

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Lot 36
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1778.) John Chaloner.
Receipt for cattle delivered to Valley Forge.

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Lot 37
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1778.)
Invoice for the support of 25 soldiers' families in Wallingford, CT .

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Lot 38
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1778.) Vasseur, engraver; after Borel.
L’Amérique Indépendante, Dédiée au Congrés des Etats Unis de l'Amérique.

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Lot 39
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1779.)
Commonplace books kept by prisoner Rufus Lincoln, a Massachusetts officer.

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Lot 40
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1779.)
Letter from a Frenchman in Maryland.

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Lot 41
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1781.) Strutt, engraver; after Pine.
To Those who Wish to Sheathe the Desolating Sword of War--America--and, to Restore the Blessings of Peace and Amity, to a Divided People.

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Lot 42
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1781.) H. Ridgely, Jr.
Letter describing the festivities in Baltimore after the Yorktown surrender.

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Lot 43
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1781.) J. Peltro, engraver; after Dodd.
. . . Gallant Defence of Captn. Pearson . . . against Paul Jones's Squadron.

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Lot 44
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--1782.)
A contemporary French listing of ships which survived their naval defeat at the Battle of the Saintes.

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Lot 45
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION.) Benjamin Day Jr.
A Loyalist returning from British-held Mississippi requests American citizenship.

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Lot 46
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--HISTORY.)
The Order Book of Capt. Leonard Bleeker, Major of Brigade . . . against the Indian Settlements of Western New York, in the Campaign of 1779.

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Lot 47
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--HISTORY.) Banastre Tarleton.
A History of the Campaigns of 1780 and 1781, in the Southern Provinces of North America.

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Lot 48
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--HISTORY) Verger, engraver; after Renault.
Triumph of Liberty, Dedicated to its Defenders in America.

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Lot 49
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--HISTORY.) [William Sigsby.]
Life and Adventures of Timothy Murphy . . . from the Commencement of the Revolution.

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Lot 50
(AMERICAN REVOLUTION--HISTORY.) T. Comer, composer.
The Tea Tax: A Yankee Comic Song.

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Lot 51
(ARCHITECTURE.) Robert Dale Owen.
Hints on Public Architecture, Containing . . . Views and Plans of the Smithsonian Institution.

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Lot 52
(ARCTIC.)
Advertisement for "McCauley & Co.'s Gigantic Panoramic . . . Illustrations of Dr. Kane's World-Renowned Last Arctic Voyage."

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Lot 53
(ART.) John B. Floyd.
Letter of recommendation for the painter Albert Bierstadt to bring on his first Western trip.

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Lot 54
(ART.) Milford Zornes.
Scrapbook kept in Asia as an Army artist during World War Two.

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Lot 55
(ART.)
Archive of the prominent mail art practitioner Stu Horn.

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Lot 56
(AVIATION.)
Ceremonies Attending the Presentation of the Wright Brothers' Aeroplane of 1903 by the Estate of Orville Wright.

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Lot 57
(AVIATION.)
Archive on the creation of the Wright Brothers National Memorial.

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Lot 58
(AVIATION.) William Price.
Set of contact sheets showing Route 40 by air from Atlantic City to San Francisco, with his camera.

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Lot 59
(BIBLE--BLIND.)
The Book of Psalms, Printed for the Blind of Great Britain and the United States.

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Lot 60
(BIBLE IN MINIATURE.)
Group of 4 thumb Bibles--one of them unrecorded.

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Lot 61
(CALIFORNIA.) Joaquin de Iturbide.
Petition by the Mexican congress for the foundation of a Californian bishopric.

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Lot 62
(CALIFORNIA.)
Group of 3 Gold Rush letters from the Curry family.

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Lot 63
(CALIFORNIA.)
Bond certificate for "expenses incurred in the suppression of Indian hostilities."

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Lot 64
(CALIFORNIA.) Edwin Stanton.
Letter written en route to California to make his national reputation, with CDV and related report.

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Lot 65
(CALIFORNIA.)
Diary of a rail trip through dozens of towns in southern California, from Fresno down to San Diego.

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Lot 66
(CALIFORNIA.) Charles F. Lummis.
The Home of Ramona: Photographs of Camulos, the Fine Old Spanish Estate.

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Lot 67
(CALIFORNIA.)
Large archive of Robert E. Callahan and his famed Mission Village auto court / theme park.

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Lot 68
(CALIFORNIA.)
Papers of Judge John Aiso, the highest-ranking Japanese-American officer in World War Two.

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Lot 69
(CANADA.) Charles B. Ellis.
Broadside to recruit laborers along the rugged Newfoundland coast for the first transatlantic cable.

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Lot 70
(CANADA.)
Archive of maps and documents from gold mines at Rat Portage, Ontario.

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Lot 71
(CANADA.)
Account journal from a profitable mining and smelting operation in British Columbia.

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Lot 72
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.)
The Exhibition of Tom Thumb; being an Account of Many Valuable and Surprising Curiosities which he has Collected.

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Lot 73
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.) Rowland Hill.
A New Hieroglyphical Bible for the Amusement & Instruction of Children.

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Lot 74
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.)
The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes; Otherwise Called Mrs. Margery Two-Shoes.

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Lot 75
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.)
The Uncle's Present, a New Battledoor.

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Lot 76
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.) [Benjamin Sands.]
Metamorphosis; or, A Transformation of Pictures, with Poetical Explanations, for the Amusement of Young Persons.

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Lot 77
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.)
Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress . . . Exhibited in a Metamorphosis, or a Transformation of Pictures.

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Lot 78
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.)
Group of 3 18th-century religious instruction books.

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Lot 79
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.)
Group of 4 early illustrated chapbooks.

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Lot 80
(CHILDREN'S BOOKS.)
Group of 5 early American chapbooks.

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Lot 81
(CIVIL WAR.)
Our Country’s Flag: "If Anyone Attempts to Haul Down the American Flag, Shoot Him on the Spot.”

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Lot 82
(CIVIL WAR.) Fitz-John Porter.
Letter as a junior officer urging the immediate defense of Baltimore.

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Lot 83
(CIVIL WAR.) John A. McClernand.
Printed report to General Grant on the Battle of Belmont--the first under Grant's command.

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Lot 84
(CIVIL WAR.) Thomas S. Wagner, lithographer.
Major General John E. Wool, United States Army.

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Lot 85
(CIVIL WAR.) Ulysses S. Grant.
Order for the transfer of a division to Sherman's corps on the eve of the second assault on Vicksburg.

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Lot 86
(CIVIL WAR.)
Carte-de-visite portrait of newly commissioned Lieutenant General Grant, signed by Edwin Stanton.

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Lot 87
(CIVIL WAR.)
Issue of the Natchitoches Union Daily printed on wallpaper.

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Lot 88
(CIVIL WAR.) James Hervey Simpson.
Letter and publications questioning the loyalty of his former commander George McClellan.

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Lot 89
(CIVIL WAR.) Alexander Bliss and John P. Kennedy, editors.
Autograph Leaves of our Country’s Authors.

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Lot 90
(CIVIL WAR.) C. Inger, lithographer.
Genl. Franz Siegel, the Hero of Missouri.

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Lot 91
(CIVIL WAR.) Ulysses S. Grant.
General Orders, No. 108--his farewell order to the troops.

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Lot 92
(CIVIL WAR.)
Broadside playbill for "Drummer Boy, or the Battle Field of Shiloh!"

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Lot 93
(CIVIL WAR.) Horace N. Fisher.
Postwar letter analyzing tactics at the Battle of Shiloh, with related articles.

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Lot 94
(CIVIL WAR.)
Group of 7 Civil War prints (and a War of 1812 print) by Kurz & Allison.

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Lot 95
(CIVIL WAR--CONFEDERATE.) Augustus Colson.
A northerner in Savannah reports on mob violence in the wake of Lincoln's election.

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Lot 96
(CIVIL WAR--CONFEDERATE.)
Southern Chivalry: The Adventures of G. Whillikens, C.S.A., Knight of the Golden Circle and of Guinea Pete, His Negro Squire, an Epic Doggerel in Six Books. By a Citizen of the Cotton Country.

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Lot 97
(CIVIL WAR--CONFEDERATE.) [Eluctius W. Treadwell.]
An Alabama soldier discusses recent battles and the future of the Confederacy.

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Lot 98
(CIVIL WAR--CONFEDERATE.)
Issue of the Southern Churchman reporting on the death of Stonewall Jackson at Chancellorsville.

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Lot 99
(CIVIL WAR--CONFEDERATE.)
Issue of the Southern Churchman reporting on the Battle of Gettysburg.

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Lot 100
(CIVIL WAR--CONFEDERATE.)
Pair of documents of Texas officer A.J. Toutant, signed by General Cooper and General Beauregard.

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Lot 101
(CIVIL WAR--CONFEDERATE.)
Almanac pour l'Annee Bissextile, 1864, an Trois de la Confederation du Sud.

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Lot 102
(CIVIL WAR--CONFEDERATE.) Robert E. Lee.
Field printing of his farewell address, "General Orders, No. 9."

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Lot 103
(CIVIL WAR--INDIAN TERRITORY.) W.L.G. Mills.
Letter offering a Unionist Cherokee perspective on the war.

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Lot 104
(CIVIL WAR--INDIANA.) George A. Simmons.
Unpublished manuscript memoir of the 11th Indiana Infantry, by one of their officers.

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Lot 105
(CIVIL WAR--IOWA.) Henry Roberts.
A soldier is moved to tears by the sight of General Sherman at the close of the Atlanta Campaign.

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Lot 106
(CIVIL WAR--NAVY.) Oliver Lasher.
Pair of letters by the acting master of the USS Young America, one describing a torpedo attack.

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Lot 107
(CIVIL WAR--NEW HAMPSHIRE.) E. Norman Gunnison.
Correspondence and poetry of a Bull Run private with a literary bent.

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Lot 108
(CIVIL WAR--NEW JERSEY.) James Hoyt.
Diary of United States Christian Commission pastor, mobbed by drunken racist Union soldiers.

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Lot 109
(CIVIL WAR--NEW YORK.)
Rockland County broadside regarding the draft.

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Lot 110
(CIVIL WAR--NEW YORK.) Augustus W. Sargent.
Diary of Corporal Sargent on the North Carolina campaign.

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Lot 111
(CIVIL WAR--OHIO.)
Family letters of a Cincinnati-area Unionist newspaper editor who was killed by a political opponent.

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Lot 112
(CIVIL WAR--OHIO.)
Letters to and from Private James Johnson of the 138th Ohio Infantry.

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Lot 113
(CIVIL WAR--PENNSYLVANIA.) Andrew L. McFarland.
Letter by a clueless Union private boasting of victory in the Shenandoah.

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Lot 114
(CIVIL WAR--WOMEN.) William Henry Austin.
Letter describing a meeting with female soldier Sarah Rosetta Wakeman.

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Lot 115
(CIVIL WAR--WOMEN.) Mary Whitney Phelps.
Partial memoir by the celebrated civilian hero of Missouri.

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Lot 116
(CONNECTICUT.) [Farquhar Macrae.]
Diary of a charming but acerbic Scottish visitor to Connecticut.

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Lot 117
(CONNECTICUT.)
Class book for Yale University Class of 1859, inscribed by most of its members.

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Lot 118
(CONSTITUTION.)
Bound volume of the Pennsylvania Herald, featuring a very early printing of the United States Constitution and more.

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Lot 119
(CONSTITUTION.) [Alexander Hamilton, et al.]
The Federalist, on the New Constitution.

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Lot 120
(CRIME.) Emmett Dalton.
When the Daltons Rode.

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Lot 121
DAVID CROCKETT.
Group of 3 books: Tour to the North and Down East / Exploits and Adventures in Texas / Narrative of the Life.

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Lot 122
GEORGE A. CUSTER.
My Life on the Plains; or, Personal Experiences with Indians.

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Lot 123
(GEORGE A. CUSTER.) David F. Barry, photographer.
Photograph of the horse Comanche, the army's only survivor from Little Bighorn.

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Lot 124
(DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.)
In Congress, July 4th 1776.

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Lot 125
(DIPLOMACY.)
Papers of Charles Tuckerman, the first United States Minister to Greece.

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Lot 126
(DIPLOMACY.)
Family letters of Ambassador Robert H. Thayer during the Cold War.

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Lot 127
(DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.)
Washington National Monument broadside.

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Lot 128
(DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.) [Kate Brown Barlow.]
Case notebook kept for the Newsboys and Children's Aid Society.

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Lot 129
(DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.)
Membership ribbon from the Blaine Invincible Republican Club of Washington, an African-American political club.

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Lot 130
(EARLY AMERICAN IMPRINT.) Samuel Clough.
Kalendarium Nov-Anglicanum, or An Almanack of the Coelestial Motions for . . . 1705.

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Lot 131
(EARLY AMERICAN IMPRINT.) Daniel Travis.
An Almanack of Coelestial Motions and Aspects for . . . 1711.

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Lot 132
(EARLY AMERICAN IMPRINT.) [Nathaniel Whittemore.]
An Almanac for the Year of Our Lord, 1718.

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Lot 133
(EARLY AMERICAN IMPRINT.) Salomon Gessner.
The Death of Abel.

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Lot 134
(EARLY AMERICAN IMPRINT.) Antonio Gavin.
A Master-Key to Popery.

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Lot 135
(FAMILY PAPERS.)
Correspondence of Ohio physician Abraham Landis and his children.

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Lot 136
(FOOD AND DRINK.)
The Cook Not Mad, or Rational Cookery.

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Lot 137
(HAWAII.) Henry L. Chase, photographer.
Group of 4 cartes-de-visite of the Hawaiian royal family.

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Lot 138
(HISTORY.)
Archive of historian William Roscoe Thayer's manuscripts, notes and correspondence.

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Lot 139
(ILLINOIS.) John Russell.
Letter contrasting the prospects for a printer in Cincinnati and rural Illinois.

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Lot 140
(ILLINOIS.)
Great Anti-Nebraska Convention, for the Military Tract will be Held at Galesburg.

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Lot 141
(ILLINOIS.) John Kitto.
The Gallery of Scripture Engravings, Historical and Landscape, Printed in Oil Colors.

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Lot 142
(ILLINOIS.) Nicholas J. Pritzker.
Three Score after Ten.

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Lot 143
(INDIANA.)
"Circular Addressed to the Friends of Liberal Education" regarding the proposed New Harmony Manual Labor College.

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Lot 144
(IOWA.)
"Wood for Sale!" broadside referencing an important Underground railroad stop in Civil Bend.

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Lot 145
(IOWA.) John W. Taylor.
Iowa, the “Great Hunting Ground” of the Indian; and the “Beautiful Land” of the White Man.

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Lot 146
(JUDAICA.) Isaac Leeser, editor.
The Form of Prayers According to the Custom of the Spanish and Portuguese Jews.

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Lot 147
(JUDAICA.) Isaac Leeser, editor.
The Book of Daily Prayers for Every Day in the Year, According to the Custom of the German and Polish Jews.

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Lot 148
(LAW.)
The Charter Granted . . . of the Massachusetts-Bay / Acts and Laws of . . . Massachusetts-Bay,

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Lot 149
(LAW.) Henry Care.
English Liberties; or, The Free-Born Subject's Inheritance.

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Lot 150
(LAW.)
Three early volumes of the Journal of the Senate of the United States of America.

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Lot 151
(ABRAHAM LINCOLN.)
Reminiscences and family papers of Lincoln sculptor William Marshall Swayne.

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Lot 152
(ABRAHAM LINCOLN.)
Assassination issue of the New York Sun.

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Lot 153
(ABRAHAM LINCOLN.) A.H. Ritchie, engraver; after Carpenter.
The First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation before the Cabinet.

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Lot 154
(ABRAHAM LINCOLN.) Ann Walker Curtis.
Diary recording stories about the Boston Tea Party, Lincoln, the Battle of Lexington and more.

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Lot 155
(ABRAHAM LINCOLN.) Adriaan M. de Groot, artist.
Portrait of Lincoln.

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Lot 156
(LOUISIANA.) William B. King.
Bloodcurdling description of the raw frontier settlement of Shreveport.

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Lot 157
(MAINE.)
Ledger of William Kilby, blacksmith in the frontier village of Dennysville.

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Lot 158
(MARITIME.)
Narrative by the supercargo of a smuggling vessel working around Jefferson's embargo.

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Lot 159
(MARYLAND.)
Pair of tavern ledgers from Frederick County.

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Lot 160
(MARYLAND.)
Medical ledgers and family correspondence of Dr. Francis Sappington of Libertytown.

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Lot 161
(MASSACHUSETTS.) Thomas Hutchinson.
The History of the Colony of Massachusetts-Bay / The History of the Province . . . / A Collection of Original Papers Relative to the History of the Colony / The History of the Province . . . from 1749 to 1774.

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Lot 162
(MASSACHUSETTS.)
Address and Resolutions Adopted by the Democracy of Norfolk.

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Lot 163
(MASSACHUSETTS.)
Archive of Russell family correspondence.

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Lot 164
(MASSACHUSETTS.)
Letters by and about the Rev. Charles H.A. Dall, missionary to India, concerning his dysfunctional marriage.

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Lot 165
(MASSACHUSETTS.)
Record book of the New Riding Club.

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Lot 166
(MEDICINE.) Edward Bliss Foote.
Science in Story. Sammy Tubbs, the Boy Doctor, and Sponsie, the Troublesome Monkey.

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Lot 167
(MEXICAN WAR.) Josiah Simpson.
A medical officer's dramatic letter on capture of Mexico City, with related papers.

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Lot 168
(MICHIGAN.)
Maps and Report . . . for Ascertaining the Northern and Northwestern Boundary between the United States and Great Britain.

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Lot 169
(MISSISSIPPI RIVER.)
Brochure for the steamboats of the St. Louis & New Orleans Anchor Line.

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Lot 170
(MISSOURI.) Camille N. Dry, artist; Richard J. Compton, editor.
Pictorial St. Louis: The Great Metropolis of the Mississippi Valley.

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Lot 171
(MISSOURI.) John Porter.
Boonville Steam Ferry . . . Table of Distances.

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Lot 171
(Mormons.)
The Book of Mormon: An Account Written by the Hand of Mormon, upon Plates Taken from the Plates of Nephi.

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Lot 172
(MORMONS.) Henry Caswall.
City of the Mormons, or, Three Days at Nauvoo.

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Lot 173
(MORMONS.) George T.M. Davis.
An Authentic Account of the Massacre of Joseph Smith.

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Lot 174
(MORMONS.) Brigham Young.
General Epistle from the Council of the Twelve Apostles.

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Lot 175
(MORMONS.)
Acts, Resolutions, and Memorials Passed by the First Annual . . . Assembly of the Territory of Utah . . . also the Constitution of the United States, and the Act Organizing the Territory of Utah.

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Lot 176
(MORMONS.)
Joseph Smith, the Prophet.

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Lot 177
(MORMONS.)
Group of cartes-de-visite by Savage, including the first three Presidents of the Church.

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Lot 178
(MUSIC.) James Lord Pierpont.
Jingle Bells, or the One Horse Open Sleigh.

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Lot 179
(NATURAL HISTORY.) Humphrey Marshall.
Arbustrum Americanum: The American Grove, or, An Alphabetical Catalogue of Forest Trees

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Lot 180
(NAVY.) William H. Hivling.
Diary of a Naval Academy midshipman on the eve of war, including a training voyage to Europe.

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Lot 181
(NAVY.)
Photograph of the USS Constitution receiving its first post-Civil War overhaul.

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Lot 182
(NEW JERSEY.)
The Thorough-Bred Stallion General Jackson.

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Lot 183
(NEW YORK.) Richard Willis, composer.
De Witt Clinton's Grand Canal March as performed . . . at the Entrance of the First Canal Boat into the Hudson River.

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Lot 184
(NEW YORK.)
Autograph album compiled at the 1846 New York Constitutional Convention.

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Lot 185
(NEW YORK.)
Handbill for American Express steamers from Niagara Falls across Lake Ontario.

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Lot 186
(NEW YORK CITY.) Roman Fekonja, artist.
Painting of the Manhattan Purchase.

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Lot 187
(NEW YORK CITY.)
Early manuscript record book of the Ancient Lutheran Trinity Church in Manhattan.

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Lot 188
(NEW YORK CITY.)
Pair of account books kept in part or full by one of New York's Founding Fathers, Richard Varick.

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Lot 189
(NEW YORK CITY.)
Certificate issued to a New York City volunteer fireman.

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Lot 190
(NEW YORK CITY.) George P. Morris, Sidney Pearson, composers.
Croton Ode . . . on the Completion of the Croton Aqueduct.

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Lot 191
(NEW YORK CITY.) Alfred R. Waud, artist.
Wall Street Ferry.

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Lot 192
(NEW YORK CITY.) William Dressler, composer.
The Firemen's Polka . . . Dedicated to Alfred Carson, Esq., Chief Engineer of the N.Y.

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Lot 193
(NEW YORK CITY.) Rufus D. Pitcher, lyricist.
The Firemen's Song, Dedicated to the New York Firemen.

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Lot 194
(NEW YORK CITY.)
Photographic broadside for Groot’s Hotel and Ladies' & Gentlemen’s Dining Saloon.

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Lot 195
(NEW YORK CITY.)
Brooklyn Bridge commemorative fan.

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Lot 196
(NEW YORK CITY.)
Woodwork designs for an opulent Manhattan townhouse.

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Lot 197
(NEW YORK CITY.) Irving Underhill, photographer.
Pair of large-format photographs of Wall Street and the New York Stock Exchange.

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Lot 198
(OHIO.) George M. Woodbridge.
Gold Has Never Been Found on the 320 Acres Land! in Vinton County, Ohio I Propose to Sell.

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Lot 199
(OIL.)
Pair of scrapbooks on the life and career of prominent geologist H.J. Von Hagen.

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Lot 200
THOMAS PAINE.
Life and Writings of Thomas Paine.

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Lot 201
(PENNSYLVANIA.) Elizabeth Willing Powel.
Documents tracing the provenance of a set of silver through several families.

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Lot 202
(PENNSYLVANIA.) Samuel and Mary Bonnell.
Diaries of a young clerk in Pennsylvania and New Orleans who hands off diary duty to his wife.

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Lot 203
(PERIODICALS.)
The American Museum.

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Lot 204
(POLITICS.) [John L. Megee, artist?]
The Sad Parting Between Two Old Friends.

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Lot 205
(POLITICS.)
How Shall Soldiers Vote?

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Lot 206
(PRESIDENTS.) Auguste Edouart, artist.
Silhouettes of President Munroe’s daughter Maria Gouverneur and a cousin.

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Lot 207
(PRESIDENTS--1848 CAMPAIGN.) Nathaniel Currier, lithographer.
Z. Taylor, M. Fillmore . . . Grand, National, Whig Banner: Press Onward.

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Lot 208
(PRESIDENTS--1850.) d'Avignon, engraver; after Mathew Brady.
Portrait of Zachary Taylor from the Gallery of Illustrious Americans.

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Lot 209
(PRESIDENTS--1852 CAMPAIGN.) [John L. Megee, artist?]
Soliciting a Vote.

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Lot 210
(PRESIDENTS--1856 CAMPAIGN.) Nathaniel Currier.
James Buchanan, John C. Breckinridge: Grand National Democratic Banner.

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Lot 211
(PRESIDENTS--1860 CAMPAIGN.) Currier & Ives.
"The Impending Crisis"--or, Caught in the Act.

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Lot 212
(PRESIDENTS--1864 CAMPAIGN.)
Dr. John L. Dunlap's Remarks on the American Army.

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Lot 213
(PRESIDENTS--1864 CAMPAIGN.)
Confidential Maine Democratic Party circular, hoping to bar soldiers from getting absentee ballots.

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Lot 214
(PRESIDENTS--1880 CAMPAIGN?)
Portrait of a boy dressed in the style of Lincoln's "Wide-Awakes."

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Lot 215
(QUAKERS.)
Epistle protesting the destruction of Quaker property for their lack of support for the Revolution.

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Lot 216
(QUAKERS.)
The Book of Discipline, Agreed on by the Yearly-Meeting of Friends for New England.

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Lot 217
(RADICALISM.)
Group of press photos of Earl Browder, head of the Communist Party U.S.A.

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Lot 218
(RAILROADS.) Christopher Meineke; composer.
Rail Road March for the Fourth of July.

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Lot 219
(RECONSTRUCTION.)
One Flag, One Country, One Constitution, One Government.

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Lot 220
(RECONSTRUCTION.) Amanda C. Ewell.
Letter describing a church meeting interrupted by rumors that "the negroes were coming in force."

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Lot 221
(RELIGION.)
Lithograph of Baron Stow by d'Avignon.

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Lot 222
(RHODE ISLAND.)
Uncut sheet of Dorr Liberation Stock certificates from the Dorr Rebellion.

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Lot 223
(RHODE ISLAND.)
Long-running barter account between Governor Greene and General Varnum.

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Lot 224
(SCIENCE & ENGINEERING.) Ezra Weld.
Patent exploitation license for an early American washing machine.

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Lot 225
(SCIENCE & ENGINEERING.)
Evans' Safety Guard.

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Lot 226
(SLAVERY & ABOLITION.)
Map of Virginia, Showing the Distribution of its Slave Population from the Census of 1860.

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Lot 227
(SLAVERY & ABOLITION.)
Composite photograph of the signers of the 13th Amendment, which banned slavery.

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Lot 228
(SPIRITUALISM.)
Spirit photograph of the medium James Henry Rheamont.

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Lot 229
(TENNESSEE.) Francis Sappington.
Letter describing war with the Cherokees and the Muscle Shoals Massacre.

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Lot 230
(TENNESSEE.)
Memorandum book of clock dealer and Cherokee land agent David Bell.

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Lot 231
(THEATER.) Madeley, lithographer; after C. Martin.
George Jones (the American Tragedian) in the Character of Hamlet.

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Lot 232
(TRAVEL.) [Zadok Cramer.]
The Navigator; Containing Directions for Navigating the Monongahela, Alleghany, Ohio, and Mississippi Rivers.

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Lot 233
(TRAVEL.) J. Calvin Smith.
A New Guide for Travelers through the United States . . . Containing all the Railroad, Stage, and Steamboat Routes.

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Lot 234
(UTOPIAN COMMUNITIES.) John O. Wattles.
Long letter regarding plans for a self-supporting school community.

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Lot 235
(UTOPIAN COMMUNITIES.)
The Circular, Published Weekly by the Oneida and Wallingford Communities.

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Lot 236
(WAR OF 1812.) William C.C. Claiborne.
"Militia General Orders" to protect New Orleans against a British invasion.

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Lot 237
(WAR OF 1812.) Samuel Seymour, engraver; after Thomas Birch.
This Representation of the U.S. Frigate United States . . . Capturing His Britannic Majesty's Frigate Macedonian . . . is Respectfully Inscribed to Capt. Stephen Decatur, his Officers and Gallant Crew.

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Lot 238
(WAR OF 1812.) Joseph Yeager, engraver; after William E. West.
Battle of New Orleans, and Death of Major General Packenham.

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Lot 239
(GEORGE WASHINGTON.)
Volume of J. Russell's Gazette, covering the death of Washington.

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Lot 240
(GEORGE WASHINGTON.)
Issue of the United States Oracle of the Day devoted to Washington's death.

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Lot 241
(GEORGE WASHINGTON.)
Group of 10 eulogies and addresses on the death of Washington.

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Lot 242
(GEORGE WASHINGTON.) Peter Maverick, engraver; after Tyler.
Eulogium Sacred to the Memory of the Illustrious George Washington.

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Lot 243
(GEORGE WASHINGTON.) Israel & Riddle, photographers.
"The Home of Washington," one of the earliest photographs of Mount Vernon.

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Lot 244
(GEORGE WASHINGTON.) H. Wright Smith, engraver; after Hicks.
Full-length engraving of General Washington at Mount Vernon.

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Lot 245
(GEORGE WASHINGTON.)
3 interesting 19th-century Washington prints.

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Lot 246
(GEORGE WASHINGTON.)
Group of 3 hand-colored engravings of scenes from Washington's life.

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Lot 247
NOAH WEBSTER.
An American Dictionary of the English Language.

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Lot 248
(WEST.) W.H. Jackson & Co., photographers.
Souvenir album of photographs of Colorado and New Mexico.

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Lot 249
(WEST.)
The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad is the Tourists’ Favorite Route between the Missouri River and Pacific Ocean.

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Lot 250
(WEST.) Rand, McNally & Co.
Illustrated Guide to Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona, with General Mining Laws.

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Lot 251
(WEST.) Spooner & Wells, photographers.
Members of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show posing in front of Grant's Tomb.

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Lot 252
(WEST--ARIZONA.) James Calhoun.
Scouting narrative by a lieutenant who later died with his brother-in-law Custer at Little Bighorn.

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Lot 253
(WEST--COLORADO.) Jonathan L. Cresson.
A group of long and detailed letters from the early days of Denver.

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Lot 254
(WEST--COLORADO.) Samuel Cushman and J.P. Waterman.
The Gold Mines Of Gilpin County, Colorado. Historical, Descriptive and Statistical.

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Lot 255
(WEST--COLORADO.)
Poncha Hot Springs, Colorado.

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Lot 256
(WEST--COLORADO.) John K. Hallowell.
Gunnison, Colorado’s Bonanza Co.

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Lot 257
(WEST--DAKOTA TERRITORY.)
Group of governor's Thanksgiving proclamations.

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Lot 258
(WEST--DAKOTA TERRITORY.)
Union Pacific Railroad, Via Omaha . . . to the Gold Fields of the Black Hills.

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Lot 259
(WEST--DAKOTA TERRITORY.) W.H. Illingworth; photographer.
Stereoview of "Camp at Hiddenwood Creek" from Custer's Black Hills Expedition.

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Lot 260
(WEST--DAKOTA TERRITORY.) Truman Ward Ingersoll.
Photographs of the Little Missouri Horse Company.

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Lot 261
(WEST--KANSAS.)
Jar of dust gathered in Kansas during the Dust Bowl, with note.

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Lot 262
(WEST--MONTANA.) F. Jay Haynes; photographer.
Views of the Villard "Gold Spike" excursion which completed the Northern Pacific.

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Lot 263
(WEST--MONTANA.) Laton A. Huffman, photographer.
Roundup Cook and Pie Biter at Work.

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Lot 264
(WEST--MONTANA.) Laton A. Huffman, photographer.
The Bow Gun Boys at Dinner.

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Lot 265
(WEST--MONTANA.) Laton A. Huffman, photographer.
Branding Fire Big Dry.

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Lot 266
(WEST--MONTANA.) Laton A. Huffman, photographer.
Group of 4 panoramic cattle ranch views.

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Lot 267
(WEST--OKLAHOMA.)
Creek Indian Lands Now on the Market.

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Lot 268
(WEST--OKLAHOMA.)
Archive of photographs from the early days of Anadarko.

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Lot 269
(WEST--TEXAS.)
Decree on punishments for Texan rebels in the wake of the Alamo.

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Lot 270
(WEST--TEXAS.) A.G. Campbell.
Letter by a patient taking the water cure at Kapp's Hydropathic Clinic.

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Lot 271
(WEST--TEXAS.) Elisha Marshall Pease.
To the Voters of Texas.

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Lot 272
(WEST--TEXAS.) Henderson Yoakum.
History of Texas from its First Settlement.

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Lot 273
(WEST--TEXAS.) Constantine W. Buckley.
Circular. To the People of Texas.

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Lot 274
(WEST--TEXAS.)
Three letters by a Virginian settler in Texas shortly after the war.

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Lot 275
(WEST--TEXAS.) Andrew Jackson Hamilton.
Address . . . to the People of Texas.

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Lot 276
(WEST--TEXAS.) Charles W. Hurley.
Notice of Quarantine.

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Lot 277
(WEST--TEXAS.)
Family letters of the Methodist minister A.E. Rector, two discussing a murder trial.

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Lot 278
(WEST--TEXAS.)
Large archive of early Texan actor and film producer Maclyn Arbuckle, including his diaries.

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Lot 279
(WEST--WASHINGTON STATE.)
Receipt for a horse requisitioned for the Yakima War.

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Lot 280
(WEST--WYOMING.)
Group of photographs of a Wyoming railroad depot town and its rugged countryside.

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Lot 281
(WHALING.) J.H. Bufford's, lithographers.
Group of 3 prints depicting the "Abandonment of the Whalers in the Arctic Ocean, Sept. 1871."

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Lot 282
(WISCONSIN.)
Broadside petition to Congress to construct a harbor at Southport (Kenosha).

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Lot 283
(WOMEN'S HISTORY.)
Issue of Amelia Bloomer’s groundbreaking newspaper The Lily.

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Lot 284
(WOMEN'S HISTORY.)
Tintype album kept by early Vassar student Harriet Griggs.

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Lot 285
WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION.
Complete set of the WPA state guides.

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Lot 286
WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION.
Group of American city and regional guides.

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Lot 287
(WORLD WAR ONE.)
Field Artillery: A Western Regiment for Western Men . . . New California Regiment.

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Lot 288
(WORLD WAR ONE.)
Bandanna titled "The Grand Victory of the Allies."

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Lot 289
(WORLD WAR ONE.)
Group of photographs from the "Polar Bear Expedition" which fought the Bolsheviks in northern Russia.

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Lot 290
(WORLD WAR TWO.)
Photographs exposing links between the America First Committee and the Nazi Party.

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Lot 291
(WORLD WAR TWO.) Yoshitsugu Saito.
Message from the Japanese commander at Saipan to his doomed troops.

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Lot 292
(WORLD WAR TWO.)
Large group of professional photographs from the Pacific Theater, including Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and the surrender.

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Lot 293
(BARBADOS.) George Pinckard.
Notes on the West Indies.

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Lot 294
(CHILE.) Alonso de Ovalle.
Historica relacion del reyno de Chile.

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Lot 295
(CHILE.) Pedro González de Agueros.
Descripcion historial de la provincia y archipielago de Chilóe, en le reyno de Chile.

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Lot 296
(CUBA.) Antonio Parra.
Descripcion de diferentes piezas de historia natural, las mas de ramo maritimo.

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Lot 297
(CUBA.) Francisco Dionisio Vives.
Cuadro estadistico de la siempre fiel Isla de Cuba . . . precedido de una descripcion historica fisica, geografica.

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Lot 298
(CUBA.) [Estéban Pichardo.]
Diccionario provincial de voces Cubanas.

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Lot 299
(CUBA.) Kohn, lithographer.
Gen'l. Narcisso Lopez.

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Lot 300
(CUBA.)
Photographs from Daiquiri, Cuba including Jennings Cox.

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Lot 301
(EXPLORATION.) David Edwin, engraver; after Edward Savage.
The Landing of Christopher Columbus.

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Lot 302
(MEXICAN COOKERY.) [Simón Blanquel.]
Novisimo arte de cocina, ó Escelente coleccion de las mejores recetas.

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Lot 303
(MEXICAN LITERATURE.) Juana Inés de la Cruz.
Complete set of her collected works.

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Lot 304
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1577.) [Alonso de Molina.]
[Confessionario mayor en la lengua mexicana y castellana.]

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Lot 305
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1585.)
[Estatutos generales de Barcelona, para la Familia Cismontana, de la Orden de nuestro

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Lot 306
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1602.) Juan de Torquemada.
Vida y milagros del sancto confessor de Christo, F. Sebastian de Aparicio.

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Lot 307
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1614.) Martín de León.
Primera parte del sermonario del tiempo de todo el año, duplicado, en lengua Mexicana.

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Lot 308
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1629.) Laurentius Surius.
Exercicios divinos, revelados al venerable Nicolas Eschio, bound with as issued, Domingo de Jesús María, Monte de piedad, y concordia espiritual.

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Lot 309
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1635.) Tomás de Jesús.
Reglas para examinar y discernir el interior aprovechamiento de un alma.

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Lot 310
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1637.) Fernando de Cepeda; and Fernando Carrillo.
Relacion universal, legitima y verdadera del sitio en que esta fundada la . . . Ciudad de Mexico.

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Lot 311
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1638.) Pedro de Contreras Gallardo.
Manual de administrar los sanctos sacramentos a los Españoles y naturales desta Nueva España.

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Lot 312
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1657.) Estevan García.
El maximo limosnero, mayor padre de pobres, grande arçobispo de Valencia . . . Thomas de Villanueva.

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Lot 313
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1668.) Marcelino de Solís y Haro.
Estatutos y constituciones reales de la imperial y regia Universidad de Mexico [from half-title].

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Lot 314
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1673.) Agustín de Vetancurt.
Arte de lengua mexicana.

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Lot 315
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1675.) Pedro Salmerón.
Vida de la Vble. Madre Isable de la Encarnacion, Carmelita Descalça, Natural de la Ciudad de los Angeles.

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Lot 316
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1680.) Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora.
Theatro de virtudes politicas, que constituyen á un principe, advertidas en los monarchas antiguos del Mexicano Imperio.

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Lot 317
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1684.) Raymundo Lumbier.
Noticia de las Sesenta, y Cinco Proposiciones Nuevamente Condenasas por . . . Inocencio XI.

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Lot 318
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1697.) [Francisco de Soria.]
Manual de exercicios, para los desagravios de Christo.

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Lot 319
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1698.)
Constituciones de la Provincia de San Diego de Mexico de los Menores descalcos.

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Lot 320
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1698.) José Ramirez.
Via lactea, seu vita candidissima S. Philippi Nerii.

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Lot 321
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1723.) Manuel Pérez.
Cathecismo romano, traducido en castellano, y mexicano.

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Lot 322
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1785.) Antonio de Guadalupe Ramírez.
Breve compendio de todo lo que debe saber, y entender el christiano . . . dispuesto en lengua othomi.

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Lot 323
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1785.) Bernardo de Gálvez.
Proclamation by the hero of Pensacola as Viceroy of New Spain.

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Lot 324
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--1804.)
Decree by the Inquisition banning or restricting 74 books.

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Lot 325
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Matías Rodríguez.
Explicacion de las sesenta y cinco proposiciones prohibidas por . . . Innocencio XI.

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Lot 326
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) [Antonio Núñez de Miranda.]
Explicacion theorica y practica aplicacion del libro quarto del Contemptus mundi.

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Lot 327
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Francisco Antonio de Ipinarrieta.
Oracion funebre, que en las exequias de doña Nicolasa Nuñez Zenteno.

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Lot 328
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Juan de la Madre de Dios.
Breve summa de la oracion mental . . . en los noviciados de los Carmelitas descalços,

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Lot 329
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) José de Barcia y Zambrana.
Epistola exhortatoria en orden a que los predicadores evangelicos no priven de la doctrina à las almas en los sermones de fiestas.

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Lot 330
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.)
Reglas de la Compañia de Jesus.

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Lot 331
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) José Gómez de la Parra.
Panegyrico funeral de la vida . . . Manuel Fernandez de Santa Cruz, obispo de la Puebla.

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Lot 332
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Manuel Fernández de Santa Cruz.
Regla . . . que han de guardar las religiosas del Convento del maximo doct. S. Geronimo del a Puebla.

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Lot 333
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Felipe Rodríguez de Ledesma.
Al Rey, Nuestro Señor en su real, y supremo Consejo de las Indias ofrece, insinuando la pusilidad de sus meritos, la deprecacon de sus reales memorias, el contenido en este (caption title).

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Lot 334
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Nicolás Simeón Salazar Flores.
Directorio de confessores que ofrece á los principiantes, y nuevos Ministros de el Sacramento de la Penitencia.

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Lot 335
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.)
Instruccion para criar novicios de el orden descalzo de N.S. del Carmen.

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Lot 336
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Antonio Vazquez Gaztelu.
Arte de lengua mexicana.

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Lot 337
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Francisco Ildephonso Segura.
Consultas varias, morales y mysticas.

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Lot 338
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Manuel de Loaisaga.
Historia de la milagrosissima imagen de nuestra señora de Occotlan, que se venera extramuros de la ciudad de Tlaxcala.

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Lot 339
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Jerónimo Cortés y Zedeño.
Arte, vocabulario y confessionario en el idioma mexicano, como se usa en el Obispado de Guadalaxara.

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Lot 340
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Andres Miguel Pérez de Velasco.
El ayudante de cura.

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Lot 341
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.)
Regla, y constituciones que han de guardar las religiosas de los conventos de nuestra señora de la Concepcion, y la santisima Trinidad de la ciudad de los Angeles.

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Lot 342
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.) Leonardo Levanto.
Cathecismo de la doctrina Christiana, en lengua zaapoteca.

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Lot 343
(MEXICAN IMPRINT--PUEBLA.)
Metodo para dar los abitos y profesiones a las que han de ser religiosas en el sagrado monasterio . . . . . . Iglesia Nuestro Padre S. Gerónimo de esta ciudad.

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Lot 344
(MEXICO.)
Reglamento e instruccion para los presidos que se han de formar la linea de frontera de Nueva España.

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Lot 345
(MEXICO.) Arzobispo de Cesaréa.
A nuestros respetables Coadjutores los Párrocos de esta Ciudad y Distrito.

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Lot 346
(PARAGUAY.) Antonio Ortiz Mayans.
Diccionario Castellano-Guarani.

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Lot 347
(PERU.)
Constitucion politica de la monarquía Española, promulgada en Cádiz a 19 de Marzo de 1812.

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Lot 348
(SOUTH AMERICA) Louis François Charon, engraver; after Martine.
Portrait of Simón Bolívar.

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Lot 349
(VENEZUELA.) José Gumilla.
El Orinoco ilustrado, y defendido, historia natural, civil, y geographica de este gran rio.

Printed & Manuscript Americana

Officers

Rick Stattler, Vice President & Director, Books & Manuscripts

Rick Stattler
Vice President & Director, Books & Manuscripts

rstattler@swanngalleries.com
(212) 254-4710 ext. 27
David Rivera, Administrator

David Rivera
Administrator

drivera@swanngalleries.com
(212) 254-4710 ext. 13

George S. Lowry
Chairman



Nicholas D. Lowry
President, Principal Auctioneer

924899

Andrew M. Ansorge
Vice President & Controller

Alexandra Mann-Nelson
Chief Marketing Officer

2030704

Todd Weyman
Vice President & Director, Prints & Drawings

1214107

Nigel Freeman
Vice President & Director, African American Art

Rick Stattler
Vice President & Director, Books & Manuscripts

Administration

Andrew M. Ansorge
Vice President & Controller

aansorge@swanngalleries.com

Ariel Kim
Client Accounting

akim@swanngalleries.com

Diana Gibaldi
Operations Manager

diana@swanngalleries.com

Bette Rothstein
Art Director

better@swanngalleries.com

Kelsie Jankowski
Public Relations Associate

kjankowski@swanngalleries.com

Shannon Licitra
Shipping Coordinator

slicitra@swanngalleries.com
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1

(alaska.) william healey dall.
An extremely detailed letter from the Alaskan wilderness in the year of the Alaska Purchase.

Nulato, Alaska, 30 December 1867 and 23 April 1868

Autograph Letter Signed to his father Charles. 12 tightly-written quarto pages, 9¾ x 7¾ inches, on 3 folding sheets of Collins Overland Telegraph illustrated cartographic letterhead; partial separations and minor wear at folds.

The explorer and scientist William Healey Dall (1845-1927) wrote this letter as a young man, after serving in the Collins Overland Telegraph Expedition from 1865 to 1867. The expedition had attempted to lay a telegraph line from California through British Columbia, the interior wilds of Russian-held Alaska, across the Bering Strait, and on to Moscow. This was seen as a more practical alternative to the failed transatlantic cable projects. However, when the first successful cable across the Atlantic was laid in 1867, the Western Union expedition folded its operation.

William’s epic letter was written in what he still describes as “Russian America,” although just two months earlier the Seward Purchase had been completed and the flag of the United States raised. He addressed it to his father, the Unitarian missionary to India, Charles Henry Appleton Dall (1816-1886, see also lot 164). William had remained behind in Alaska after the Americans ended the expedition, wintering over in a small trading post with Russians and “a little halfbreed boy who Ketchum brought down as an interpreter from Fort Yukon, and whom I volunteered to take care of, feed, clothe, & get home again in the spring,” as well as two Inuit: “my faithful Rurill, the other Peetka, whose hand I saved last year after he had blown it pretty well to pieces by careless use of his gun.” He describes the Russian inhabitants as “most of them felons, sent here from Siberia . . . For lying, stealing, and all petty meannesses and gross vices, taken as a whole they would be hard to match.” He goes on to describe his entire past year’s adventures: paddling down the coast of the Bering Sea by night in a small walrus-skin craft, searching for a harbor by the Northern Lights; climbing a 70-foot cliff by himself to collect a cache of fossils, “dropping from ledge to ledge by the light birch which grew in the clefts of the rock.” William held onto the letter all winter without any opportunity for sending it, and then resumed on 23 April, still in Nulato. Here he describes (and draws) the style of fish trap used on this coast. He also describes the frenzied reaction of the Russians who had been told to liquidate the Fur Company, “pack up all the company’s property and put it on a raft, abandon the fort to the elements & the Indians, and float down to the mouth of the Youkon.” Months later, he still had found no means of sending the letter, so added three more pages on 26 September 1868: “I shall give you an account of my trip down the Youkon & narrow escape from being shot by an Indian on the way, when I get home.”

WITH–a much shorter second letter from Dall to his mother, San Francisco, 4 October 1868, while headed home: “You must expect to see a rough sunburnt individual whose nose has been reddened by frequent freezing; and whose complexion has not been improved by the Arctic sun & wind, or a diet of fish and sealmeat; and whose temper has suffered from driving dogs.”

AND–an undated, untitled, unsigned speech on the growth of the Episcopal Church in Alaska, 17 pages on loose sheets, 9½ x 5¾ inches. It was apparently written for an audience of Episcopalians (see page 9). The events of 1886 are described as “less than 20 years ago,” and the term of Bishop Peter Rowe is described as extending “for ten years” (page 15), suggesting a date of 1905.

Estimate

$2,000 – $3,000

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2

(american indians.) john raphael smith, engraver; after wright.
The Widow of an Indian Chief Watching the Arms of Her Deceas’d Husband.

London: J.R. Smith, 29 January 1789

Mezzotint, 17¾ x 21¼ inches; trimmed within platemark, mounted on early stiff paper, 1-inch closed tear in lower right corner, moderate toning.

The first engraving of a much-beloved 1784 painting, usually known by the simpler title “Indian Widow,” which is now in the Derby Museum in England. It was likely inspired by a passage on Muscogee and Chickasaw funerary rites in James Adair’s 1775 “History of the American Indians,” page 187: “If he was a war-leader, she is obliged for the first moon, to sit in the day-time under his mourning war-pole, which is decked with all his martial trophies, and must be heard to cry with bewailing notes. . . . They are allowed no shade, or shelter.” A stormy coastline and raging volcano can be seen in the background. Perhaps the painting could also be read as an allegory for Great Britain’s recent loss of its American colonies.

Estimate

$1,000 – $1,500

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3

(american indians.) william webb.
Letter describing the Creek War of 1836.

Coal Creek [AL?], 7 July 1836

Autograph Letter Signed to John Cooper of Upper Alton, IL. 2 pages, 11¾ x 7¾ inches, plus integral address leaf marked only “25” in manuscript; minor foxing, wear and repaired tear to address leaf.

“Our volenters started on yesterday for the Creak Nation. About 150 went out of this county. Thare has bin some fiting olredy and som killed on booth sides. We hope the ware won’t last long. The govener cauld for 25 hundred volenters and I expect that 5000 thousand has gone.”

Estimate

$500 – $750

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4

(american indians.) george jones.
The History of Ancient America . . . Proving the Identity of the Aborigines with the Tyrians

London, 1843

and Israelites. Frontispiece portrait of the author, engraved additional title page bearing alternate title “An Original History of Ancient America, Founded upon the Ruins of Antiquity.” [18], 461, [2] pages including page of publisher’s ads at end. 8vo, contemporary gilt red morocco presentation binding by Lewis B. Gough, minor wear; portrait toned, minor foxing to second title, otherwise quite clean internally; binder’s tag on rear pastedown, all edges gilt.

First edition. George Jones (1810-1879) was an eccentric theatrical star who was born in England but spent most of his career in the United States. He later styled himself “George, Count Joannes.” In this work, written during his residence in England, he attempted to demonstrate that America was first settled by Europeans long before the time of Christ. This copy is inscribed by the author to Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge (1774-1850), uncle to Queen Victoria.

For a portrait of Jones (from a different consignor), see lot 231. Field 801; Howes J214; Sabin 36501 (“The work is entirely speculative in its character, and grandiloquent in style”).

Estimate

$400 – $600

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5

(american indians.) thomas mckenney and james hall.
History of the Indian Tribes of North America.

Philadelphia, 1855

120 hand-colored lithographed plates. iv, 333; xvii, [9]-290; iv, 17-392 pages. 3 volumes. Large 8vo, publisher's full morocco with ornamental frame stamped on covers, binding detached on volume II, otherwise minor wear; minimal foxing; all edges gilt, a handsome unsophisticated copy; early bookplates on front pastedowns, owner's inked stamps on free endpapers.

Third octavo edition of the classic work of American Indian portrait iconography, with color plates after paintings later destroyed in the 1865 Smithsonian fire. The original edition in folio format was published in 1836-44. “The most colorful portraits of Indians ever executed”–Howes M129 (“aa”).

Estimate

$6,000 – $9,000

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A SEMINAL TEXT OF SCIENTIFIC RACISM

6

(american indians.) samuel george morton.
Crania Americana; or, A Comparative View of the Skulls of Various Aboriginal Nations of North and South America.

Philadelphia: J. Dobson, 1839

Hand-colored map, phrenological chart, 78 lithographic plates of skulls and mummified remains, numerous text illustrations. [4], v, 296, [1] pages, plus related circular bound in. Folio, disbound, with original worn and detached paper-covered boards; wear and dampstaining to the frontispiece and preliminary leaves, minor foxing; uncut.

Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) was a Philadelphia medical school professor and well-respected scientist in his time. He collected skulls and other remains from across North and South America, comparing cranial sizes and determining that Caucasians had superior brain capacity. His work was influential in the early years of what is now termed scientific racism, and was used to justify slavery. His collection of skulls made their way to the University of Pennsylvania. A recent report by Paul Wolff Mitchell, “Black Philadelphians in the Samuel George Morton Cranial Collection,” pointed out the disturbing nature of the collection, and just this past April, the university museum pledged to repatriate some of these human remains.

The plates are mostly by lithographers John Collins and Thomas Sinclair; Collins was known for producing views of Philadelphia and Newport, RI. Bound in after the final plate is a circular signed in type by Collins dated Philadelphia, 1 November 1839, 10 x 7¼ inches, explaining that he had been “almost exclusively engaged for two years past” on Crania Americana and was now eager to tackle on new projects, particularly lithography for other anatomical works.

An enthusiastic quote by an 1873 bibliographer shows the seriousness with which Morton’s work was treated at the time: “Both in this country and in Europe, wherever learning and science are reverenced, Mr. Morton’s work has been recognized, as one of the best contributions to exact knowledge of the history of man, ever offered as the work of one individual”–Field 1100. Sabin 51022.

Estimate

$800 – $1,200

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7

(american indians.) william a. phillips.
Defense of the Cherokee Nation’s right to sell land in Kansas.

[Kansas], circa 1868

4 printed pages, 9¼ x 6 inches, on one folding sheet, signed in type by Phillips “for the Cherokee Nation”; folds, minor foxing.

William Addison Phillips (1824-1893) was born in Scotland and had been an anti-slavery journalist in Kansas, served as colonel of the Union Army’s Cherokee regiment during the Civil War, and then worked as an attorney for the Cherokee Nation. He later served six years in Congress. In this circular letter addressed “To the Honorable, the Senate of the United States,” he argues that the Cherokee held their land by patent rather than treaty: “Their title is as perfect as that to any property in this country. If it is to be called into question, there is an end of all security.” The Cherokee sought to sell these excess lands to help support “nearly 800 orphans of war for the Union alone” and fund thirty English-language schools. The Senate sought to block the sale in favor of other investors including a railroad line. OCLC lists one copy of this letter, at Yale.

Estimate

$500 – $750

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8

(american indians.) john ross.
Message of the Principal Chief to the National Committee and Council.

Van Buren, AR: A. Clarke, 1856

4 printed pages, 9 x 6 inches, on one folding sheet; foxing, folds, moderate wear.

The important Cherokee leader John Ross (1790-1866) delivers a state of the nation address, lauding the Cherokee progress in Indian Territory: “Peace and prosperity prevail within our limits. . . . The cause of civilization among us progresses, if not rapidly, at a steady and manifest pace. . . . Religion and education have received marked attention.” He acknowledges complaints that missionaries had been fomenting trouble among the territory’s enslaved people: “Slavery being recognized by the laws of the nation, is entitled to protection from agitation and disturbance. . . . The existence of slavery among us is sanctioned by our own laws and by the intercourse of the government of the United States. . . . The disturbed condition of affairs in Kansas in which we have lands . . . attracts attention here as well as elsewhere. . . . Our true policy is to mind our own business, and not travel beyond our own limits to seek difficulties.” Ross also denounces “the nefarious traffic in stolen horses carried on by thieves from the Indian country with citizens of the neighboring states.”

While other similar messages of the principal chief are traced in OCLC for 1859 and other dates, we find no record of this message in OCLC or elsewhere. Nor do we find any record of it being published in full elsewhere, although the New Orleans Times-Picayune of 18 December 1856 quoted the pro-slavery portions approvingly.

Estimate

$2,000 – $3,000

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9

(american indians.)
Papers of Joshua Ross, a Muskogee merchant and prominent Cherokee.

Various places, 1848-1918 (bulk 1872-1907)

230 items (0.3 linear feet) in one box: 176 letters, almost all addressed to Joshua Ross, many with original envelopes, plus receipts, genealogical memoranda, and printed ephemera; condition general strong, with a few items worn.

This archive covers a critical period in Cherokee history, from 1898 to 1906, when the federal government aggressively dismantled the Cherokee Nation’s independent government and transformed the Indian Territory into the new state of Oklahoma.

Joshua Ross (1833-1924) of Muscogee, Indian Territory was a nephew of longtime Cherokee principal chief John Ross (1790-1866). He was an 1860 graduate of Emory and Henry College in Virginia. His wife was Muskogee Yargee Ross (circa 1840s-1913), from a similarly prominent Creek family and also influential in the community. They resided in Muskogee in the Creek Nation, where Joshua became a prominent leader and shopkeeper.

The earliest item in the collection is an 1848 letter from cousin Minerva Murrell to Ross while he was attending boarding school in Fayetteville, AR, exhorting him to be pious and modest: “Show your teacher how well a Cherokee boy can behave himself.” The bulk of the collection begins in 1872. Cherokee politics (particularly the race for Principal Chief which often included a Ross family candidate) and tribal membership claims are frequent topics of conversation from the beginning. H.C. Hedrick of Sherman TX writes in 1878 regarding a friend who wants to settle in Creek Nation for business: “He fears he cannot get satisfactory evidence that he is of Indian blood . . . look him up a good looking smart young Creek squaw and he will obtain rights in the nation after the old plan. But, joking aside, he is willing to go to the nation and operate with you.” Joshua’s cousin William Potter Ross (1820-1891), the former and future Principal Chief of the Cherokees, wrote from Washington on 4 January 1872: “Our people–the Indian people–should not shut their eyes to the fact that sooner of later their political relations must undergo a change. It is no want of patriotism to say so much as that. . . . Called with the unvarnished multitude to pay New Year’s compliments to the President [Grant]. . . . Major Boudinot, Dr. Long, Col. Pitchlynn, Judge Fields & Genl. Cooper are also in the city.” Two letters from Indian agents dated March and April 1873 negotiate the prices to be paid for cattle killed by railroads in Creek Territory.

Ross was a leader of the Indian International Fair from its 1874 inception. The fair brought together representatives from nations across the Indian Territory and beyond. 13 letters relate to the fair, including communications from several other nations. An 1882 letter promises “If you could get Col. Tunstall a full Indian costam I will pay the money for the buck skin suit for him and I will bring him . . . to the Indian Internation Fair.” Also included are a manuscript list of premiums awarded at the inaugural 1874 fair; an undated manuscript list of submitted items arranged by nation, and a printed handbill program for the 6th fair in 1879 which gives the four-day schedule and the rules. OCLC lists only one copy. Finally, an 1891 letter complains: “Our people seem to have lost interest in our fair and the 2 or 3 of us who have kept it up for the last 4 years have got tired of doing all the work, and myself footing all the bills. We have concluded to let it rest for a while.”

The letters get more intense in the late 1890s as the Curtis Act of 1898 started to threaten the Cherokee Nation. H.C. Ross wrote on 13 March 1899: “Things are so complicated. I mean our public affairs. What will become of us? Nobody can tell. As all the government officials are in your town, you may know what they are going to do about the Curtis law, whether it will be enforced in full.” Ross’s sister Jennie Murrell wrote frequently from Bayou Goula, LA during this period. On 8 January 1898 she wrote: “I am astonished at the Cherokee lawyers trying to deny our Cherokee blood. I am willing to leave it to any Cherokee & I dare say ours is purer & better Cherokee blood than those who testify to a lie. I don’t want to be left out, so do all you can.” Similarly cousin George Murrell wrote on 29 October 1896: “I regret that you failed to get our names on the census rolls. . . . I dislike to think I am disowned & have no claim in the country my grandfather & father lived in for so long, and loved so well.” Brother J.M. Ross tried to untangle the history of a family enslaved by the Rosses in a 20 April 1896 letter: “Calvin Ross was a son of Chaney daughter of Sam & Betsey Ross, slaves of mother. His father was Andy Fields, slave of Mrs. Sallie Fields, and after her death was bought by her son Rider Fields, who lived in the Creek Nation. Calvin had a half brother named Buck that lived with bro. Dick Ross.” Ross wrote to a contact in Washington, Simon Walkingstick, on 28 June 1898: “Please send true copy of the Curtiss Bill . . . The Dawes Commission are sending out their wagons . . . to Seminole Nation to take census and about the middle of July or summer will come to the Creeks for the same purpose.” Cherokee leader Jesse Cochran wrote from Washington on 9 March 1908(?): “I have little to write encouraging a hope that the Cherokees will be fairly treated by the Government. Our fate is sealed and we can only take such settlement as they are willing to give us out of our own property. The old treaties have been thrown to the winds. . . . We have no sympathizers here as of old. The Indian Territory is an open door to the people of the U.S., and they propose to go in and help themselves.”

More detailed notes on this important Cherokee archive are available upon request.

Estimate

$5,000 – $7,500

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10

(american indians.) john p. williamson, compiler.
An English-Dakota School Dictionary. Wasicun Qa Dakota Ieska Wowapi.

Yankton Agency, Dakota Territory: Iapi Oaye Press, 1886

[6], 144 pages. 8vo, ½ calf, backstrip chipping, moderate wear; minor foxing and dampstaining, a few leaves coming loose.

Second edition. Some of the Dakota words are given in both the Santee and Yankton dialects. The intended audience was the Dakota reader attempting to learn English. The compiler notes in his introduction that “there are one hundred Dakota people who should learn to speak English to one English speaking person who should learn to speak Dakota.” Pilling, Siouan, page 77.

Estimate

$300 – $400

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11

(american indians–photographs.) david f. barry.
Group of 5 photographs including Sitting Bull at the dedication of Standing Rock.

Various places, circa 1886-1913

Various sizes and formats, condition generally strong except as noted.

Sitting Bull at the dedication of Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Silver print, 6 x 10 inches, on original mount, with “Barry” blindstamp, printed label on verso, and personal inscriptions on mount recto and verso; minor chipping and staining to mount. Standing Rock Reservation, SD, [1886], printed 1913. A copy held by the Smithsonian is titled “Sitting Bull performing ceremonies at Standing Rock, 1886.” Sitting Bull stands to the left, foreground. The man at the right is interpreter Joe Premeau. At center is the Indian agent, Major James McLaughlin, who had a long relationship with Sitting Bull and the Hunkpapa Lakota. He accompanied Sitting Bull to Washington in 1888, and in 1890 ordered Sitting Bull’s arrest which went horribly awry. This copy was printed later by the photographer and inscribed to Mrs. M.H. Jewell.

“Sitting Bull’s Family,” 7¼ x 9¼ inches, captioned in image, with photographer’s gilt stamp in mount. Shows Sitting Bull’s two widows and two daughters standing outside the doorway where he was killed.

A cabinet card featuring the same image, with Barry’s illustrated backmark.

Self-portrait of Barry, 8 x 4½ inches to sight, in his original decorative mat with “Barry” blindstamp in margin and inscribed “For Mrs. Jewell, from D.F. Barry.”

Uncredited cabinet card portrait of Marshall H. Jewell, publisher of the Bismarck Tribune, chipped, not attributed to Barry.

Estimate

$800 – $1,200

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12

(american indians–photographs.) edward s. curtis.
Unpublished cyanotype of five men in a Piegan lodge.

Montana?, circa 1910

Cyanotype print, 5¾ x 7¾ inches, marked “D87 Piegan” on verso; minimal wear.

This view did not appear in the 20-volume Curtis masterwork portfolio, The North American Indian. However, it dates from the same sitting as another which did appear in Volume VI, under the title of “In a Piegan Lodge.” The man at right here appears in this alternate view, where he is named as Yellow Kidney.

Estimate

$1,000 – $1,500

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13

(american indians–photographs.) camillus s. fly, photographer.
The Captive White Boy, Santiago McKinn.

Tombstone, AZ, March 1886 image

Albumen photograph, 4¾ x 8 inches, on original mount, with photographer’s copyright statement in the negative, and his printed sticker on verso, image #170 from Fly’s “Scene in Geronimo’s Camp” series; minor foxing and wear.

In March 1886, The Arizona photographer Camillus Fly accompanied General Crook’s forces for their negotiations with Geronimo’s band of Chiricahua Apache, who were holding out in the Sierra Madre mountains about 20 miles south of the New Mexico border. Fly was surprised to discover a fair-skinned child playing among the Apache children, and arranged this photograph.

The child was Santiago “Jimmy” McKinn (1875-1941), aged 11, son of an Irish-American father and Mexican-American mother. The Apaches had raided his family’s New Mexico ranch in September 1885, killing his older brother and taking Jimmy captive. The father John McKinn pursued the Apaches but was told the boy had been killed. During his six months in captivity, Santiago became fluent in the Apache language, and resisted returning to his birth family. He was placed aboard a train with other Apache prisoners bound for Florida, but his parents were allowed to collect him when the train stopped in Deming, NM. He went on to raise a family in New Mexico, spending his final years in Phoenix, AZ.

Estimate

$5,000 – $7,500

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14

(american indians–photographs.) camillus s. fly, photographer.
Geronimo and Natches Mounted.

Tombstone, AZ, March 1886 image

Albumen photograph, 4¾ x 8 inches, on original mount, with photographer’s copyright statement in the negative, and his printed sticker on verso, image #171 from Fly’s “Scene in Geronimo’s Camp” series; light crease with an inch of image loss around Geronimo’s shoulder, moderate foxing.

In March 1886, The Arizona photographer Camillus Fly accompanied General Crook’s forces for their negotiations with Geronimo’s band of Chiricahua Apache, who were holding out in the Sierra Madre mountains about 20 miles south of the New Mexico border. Mounted on the left is the famed Chiricahua Apache leader Geronimo. The man at his left (holding a baby) is Geronimo’s son. On the other horse is Naices (here spelled Natches), the hereditary chief of the Chiricahua Apaches. Geronimo and his band escaped shortly after surrendering.

Estimate

$4,000 – $6,000

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15

(american indians–photographs.) [alexander gardner.]
Cabinet card portrait of Thrach-Tche, or True Eagle, Missouria.

Washington, DC, image date 1874

Albumen print, 5¼ x 3¾ inches, on original U.S. Geological and Geographical Survey mount; minimal wear.

About 80 years old when this picture was taken, Thrach-Tche served as chief of the Missouri nation from circa 1860 until 1874, when they joined with the Otoes (Jackson, 1877 Descriptive Catalogue, 481).

Estimate

$800 – $1,200

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16

(american indians–photographs.) de lancey gill, photographer.
Portrait of the Oglala leader White Mountain.

[Washington, image from September 1907, early 20th century print]

Silver print, 10 x 7¾ inches, unsigned and uncaptioned, pencil number “7276” on verso; a bit of blue along left and right edges of margin, minimal wear.

White Mountain was also known as “Shot in the Eye” because of a wound he suffered at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. In 1901, he went east to participate in the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, NY, where he gave a remarkable interview to the Buffalo Courier (10 May 1901). In his long account of Little Bighorn, he asserted that Custer was not killed in battle–he committed suicide rather than face capture and torture. This account has not been corroborated by other sources.

This photograph was taken a few years later in September 1907 by De Lancey W. Gill, who was an illustrator and staff photographer for the Smithsonian’s Bureau of American Ethnology. One of his responsibilities was photographing American Indian leaders as they came through Washington on official business. White Mountain is wearing a peace medal depicting George Washington (issued in 1903). This photograph is not signed or captioned, but the Smithsonian holds a captioned negative.

WITH–5 smaller uncredited prints also said to be by De Lancey Gill, although they are mostly field photographs rather than formal portraits. Two are captioned. One of them, “Kindling Fire by Friction,” was actually shot by Jack Hillers for the Geological Survey circa 1870. These prints were apparently produced from earlier negatives in the early 20th century.

Estimate

$1,500 – $2,500

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17

(american indians–photographs.) john c. grabill, photographer.
A Pretty Group at an Indian Tent.

[South Dakota], 1891

Albumen print, 9¼ x 10¼ inches, captioned and numbered 3639 in negative, on plain mount; minor foxing, minor dampstaining and wear to mount; early inked inscription on verso.

This photograph, likely posed, was copyrighted in the aftermath of the Wounded Knee Massacre. The subcaption reads “Jack Redcloud brings the news of surrender and end of the war to his lady friends.” On verso is a note reading “Brought from the west by Col. N.W. Osborne U.S.A. circa 1877.” That date precedes the copyright by many years, but Nathan Ward Osborne served as colonel of the 5th United States Infantry from 1888 until his death in 1895.

Estimate

$500 – $750

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18

(american indians–photographs.) harold kellogg.
Buffalo dancers and others at San Ildefonso Pueblo in New Mexico.

Santa Fe, NM, circa 1930s

Group of 4 gelatin silver prints in brass mat, each 2¾ x 3¾ oval to sight; minimal wear. Not examined out of 8¾ x 10¾-inch frame, which bears an inscription on verso: “2880 Buffalo Dancers / San Ildefonso / Rose R Roberts Gonzales / The Harold Kellogg Pictures / Indian Scenes Natural Photos / PO Box 191 / Santa Fe, New Mexico.”

Harold Evans Kellogg (1897-1968) was a photographer in Santa Fe, NM from at least 1932 onward. His photographs decorated the tea room at Santa Fe’s College of Indian Wisdom, according to the Santa Fe New Mexican, 18 July 1932.

Estimate

$300 – $400

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19

(american indians–photographs.) lenny & sawyers, photographers
Pair of boudoir cards of Kiowa women.

Purcell, Indian Territory [OK], circa 1890

Albumen prints, each about 7 x 4¼ inches on photographer’s mounts; light scuff to one card, otherwise minimal wear.

A woman and her child appear in the shadows of a tipi with wagons in the background; the other shows a woman posed in a studio setting.

Estimate

$600 – $900

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20

(american indians–photographs.) [george e. trager].
Pair of promenade cards of the Ghost Dance at Pine Ridge.

Chadron, NE: Northwestern Photographic Co., 25 December 1890

Albumen prints, each about 4 x 7 inches, on original mounts, one with photographer’s backmark, the other captioned in negative; one with punch holes in mount corners and moderate wear, the other with only minor wear.

These photographs were taken at the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, 10 days after the arrest of Sitting Bull pushed tensions near the breaking point, and just 4 days before the United States Cavalry killed hundreds of Lakota in the Wounded Knee Massacre. One of these photographs is captioned faintly in the negative “Rose Bud and Sioux Indian War Dance at Pine Ridge Agcy, Dec 25th 1890, S. Dak.,” but has no photographer credit. The other was apparently taken on the same day–a man with the same white shirt and belt appears in the foreground of each. It bears the backmark of George Trager’s Northwestern Photographic Company of Chadron, NE, offering views of “Wounded Knee Battle, Indian camps . . . everything of interest in the late Pine Ridge War.” It also offers a quack epilepsy cure by the firm of Trager & Ford.

Estimate

$600 – $900

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NOTE THE SCALP MOUNTED TO THE SHIELD IN FOREGROUND

21

(american indians–photographs.) william soule.
Indian Lodges of Buffalo Skins & Cedar Poles.

Indian Territory, 1872

Albumen photograph, 7¾ x 5½ inches, on original 10½ x 7¼-inch plain mount with manuscript caption, numbered 435 in negative; minor foxing and minor wear to mount.

William Stinson Soule (1836-1908) spent eight years in the west. In 1872 he was the post photographer at Fort Sill in what is now Oklahoma. This large-format card photograph shows an encampment of 4 tipis, with a woman working in the background. The extended caption notes that the tipis measured 18 feet in diameter and 20 feet in height, and calls attention to the “method of fastening covering on frame; also arrangement for ventillation & the entrance as closed when the occupants are out. Shield, with scalp in centre, on tripod in fore-ground.”

Estimate

$1,000 – $1,500

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22

(american indians–photographs.)
Group of 11 cartes-de-visite, tintypes, cabinet cards, and stereoviews.

Various places, circa 1870s-early 20th century

Various formats, condition generally strong.

D.C. Herrin of East Portland, OR, “Camp Where Sitting Bull Surrendered,” cabinet card.

Group of 3 uncredited and uncaptioned tintype portraits, about 3½ x 2½ inches, clipped at corners.

Upton’s Minnesota & Northwestern Views of Minneapolis, “Red River Carts,” stereoview.

S.A. Ray, untitled view of a funeral scaffold, 5 x 6½ inches.

“3094 Groop of Apache Indians” (sic), uncredited steroview.

John Nicholas Choate, “Pueblos as they Arrived” from Laguna, NM, at Carlisle Indian Training School, named on verso, cabinet card.

Uncredited and uncaptioned image of seated couple with rifle, mounted cyanotype, 4 x 5 inches.

Buchtel & Stolte of Portland, OR, untitled carte-de-visite of two seated men with sabers.

H.H. Bennett of Kilbourn City, WI, “Among the Winnebago Indians: Ha-zah-zoch-kah (Branching Horns),” stereoview.

Estimate

$700 – $1,000

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23

(american indians–photographs.)
Group of 7 unmounted photographs.

Various places, undated but all circa 1900-30

Various sizes and formats, condition generally strong.

“Indian Village, Crow, Montana,” gelatin silver print, 4 x 6½ inches, matted.

“Squaw Dancers,” real photo postcard, 3¼ x 5¼ inches.

Untitled and credited image of 3 men and a wagon backstage at a wild west show, gelatin silver print, 4 x 5 inches.

George Lyman Rose, “Yava Supai Indian Girl, Cataract Canyon,” albumen print, 8 x 6 inches.

Pair of portraits of “Ka-Ti-Sa-Tchi (Don’t Go Out), commonly known on the reserve as Whisky John,” cyanotype prints, each 8½ x 6½ inches.

Shemild of Minneapolis, photographer, “Chief Max Big Man, Crow,” gelatin silver print on heavy stock, light folds, 8 x 10 inches.

Estimate

$500 – $750

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24

(american indians–photographs.)
Group of 9 mostly larger-format mounted images.

Various places, circa 1870s-1890s

Various sizes and formats, condition generally strong.

George Benjamin Wittick, “Inauguration Dance . . . View in Pueblo Laguna, New Mexico,” mounted albumen print, 7¼ x 9¼ inches, Laguna, NM, 12 January 1887.

[Joseph K. Dixon?], uncaptioned image of two figures seated in front of tipi, mounted albumen print, 5 x 7 inches, matted.

D.B. Chase of Santa Fe, NM, “Indian Dancers from San Ildefonso,” mounted albumen promenade card, 4¼ x 7 inches.

L.B. Shaw of Elmwood, MA, “Cabin Built by the Indian Princesses at Lakeville” (Wampanoags descended from Chief Massasoit), albumen print, 4½ x 6¾ inches.

Uncredited image of an outdoor council, possibly Cheyenne in Indian Territory, mounted albumen print, 4½ x 7½ inches, mount cracked.

Group of 4 uncredited and uncaptioned images: 3 thought to show Creeks gathered at Okmulgee, Indian Territory in the early 1870s, plus one unidentified portrait, all mounted albumen prints, about 5½ x 8 inches.

Estimate

$800 – $1,200

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"AMERICA MUST IN A SHORT TIME BE THE HABITATION OF BANKRUPTS, BEGGARS & SLAVES"

25

(american revolution–prelude.)
Opposition to the Stamp Act as seen in the letterbook of a New York iron merchant.

New York, February 1765 to April 1771

[82] manuscript pages, including retained copies of 77 letters and 8 detailed merchandise orders. Folio, 13 x 8 inches, disbound; many pages loose and possibly a small number absent, moderate edge wear with minimal loss of text.

Garret Abeel (1734-1799) and his brother-in-law Evart Byvanck (1744-1805) began a successful partnership as Manhattan iron merchants in 1765. This letterbook contains retained drafts for much of their correspondence through 1771, reflecting a tumultuous period which led to the American Revolution. Most of the letters are to the firm’s British suppliers of finished metal goods, and many discuss the dominant issue of the day: organized American resistance to British taxation. Abeel and Byvanck often made their orders contingent upon repeal of the Stamp Act or some other Parliamentary action, and pressured their wealthy suppliers to use their clout to restore trade. They often cited the joint resolutions of American merchants, including a flurry of letters written in the week after the Non-Importation Act of 1765.

The letterbook begins with a letter of introduction to the British firm of Devonshire & Reeve, followed by a 3-page itemized list of iron goods the young Americans ordered from them on 6 February 1765, as well as a similarly large follow-up order placed in August. Abeel & Byvanck was off to a grand start with a major British supplier; imagine their consternation with the imposition of the Stamp Act and the resulting Non-Importation Agreement entered by the leading New York merchants on 31 October 1765. That same day they sent a letter to British merchants Neate, Pigou & Booth: “If it had not been for the late acts of Parliament such as the Sugar and Stamp Acts, should have wanted several large articles sent us by your house, but while they are in being, dare not order a single article in the way of trade, nor do we believe anyone else from this place will order goods till those acts are repealed.” Abeel & Byvanck drafted a stern letter to their main supplier Devonshire & Reeve on 2 November 1765, asking to send their last order “only in case the Stamp Act is repealed . . . for should not the late strictures laid upon our trade by the Parliament be taken off, America must in a short time be the habitation of bankrupts, beggars & slaves. . . . In money we are sure they cannot be paid long. That, like a bird of passage, flies or has already fled from our inhospitable land.” The young merchants took four days to calm down, crossed out this version of the letter, and drafted another less confrontational version which summarized the Non-Importation Agreement: “Altho we are but young beginners, and our success in business has exceeded our most sanguine expectations, yet willing to sacrifice the prospect of private advantage to the good of our country we have joined our fellow citizens in the following resolutions: First, that in all orders they send out to Great Britain for goods or merchandise . . . they will direct their correspondents not to ship them, unless the Stamp Act is repealed. . . . We shall not offer anything against the late impositions put upon us by the British Parliament, making no doubt but abler pens than ours have communicated to you what may be said on so disagreeable a subject.”

On 27 August 1766, the firm wrote again to Devonshire & Reeve to discuss the recent repeal: “Upon the receipt of the account of the repeal of the Stamp Act, the Americans were softned down more speedy that could be imagined. The words tyranny, oppression & rebellion were no more heard. Evryone strove how he should most express his loyalty to the best of Kings and gratitude to the patriotick ministry.” However, “the life of trade is still wanting, circulating mediam is nearly sunk, and we are debard the liberty of making any more paper money.”

The 24 September 1766 letter to Devonshire & Reeve reflects a return to normal trade across the Atlantic, but with a new wrinkle: “As there is some likelihood of a war between England and France. If such a thing should happen . . . send us by first opportunity two tons of best FF powder over and above what we have already ordered as also two tons shot sorted, two cask bar lead, & one doz four foot gun barrels. Please to let the powder be unglazed.” On 16 January 1767 they wrote to Reeve, thanking “those who were our friends at home in obtaining the repeal of the Stamp Act” who “certainly deserve a greatfull return for their services.” Apparently Abeel & Byvanck and other patriotic American merchants were trying to support these allies in trade, but certain shady British merchants were attempting to break into the trade with unrealistic bargains on shoddy goods. A 7 April 1767 letter makes passing reference to the British commander in North America Thomas Gage, who apparently helped settle the firm’s debts in New York. On 24 August 1767 they assured Reeve that “N. Yorkers are far from being separated from the mother country, altho it may be the opinion of many in your part of the world that they are ripe for a rebellion. . . . It’s true the rigorous proceedings of the H of C makes many people think hard of it, but what can we do but grin & bear it?”

The firm’s 19 November 1768 letter to British supplier Henry Cruger finds them again pressuring their British friends to pressure Parliament, offering to place a large order only “if the acts of Parliament imposing duties on paper, paint & glass are repealed, which I hope & flatter ourselves will be done through the influence of our good friends in London, Bristol &c.” They wrote similarly to Cruger on 30 September 1769: “We flatter ourselves that through the struggles of our friends in Europe & the methods pursued by us, we shall get relieved from the oppressive acts at the next meeting of Parliament.” A remarkable long letter dated 12 October 1769 sets forth the many ways which British tax policy has brought the colonies together: “They have been the means of uniting the colonies in a bond of friendship &c which we hope will last forever. They have made the Americans more frugal & industrious by . . . forcing them to enter upon the manufactory of a great many articles which they before imported from Great Britain.”

The American merchants remained firm. Abeel & Byvanck wrote a British merchant on 10 July 1770: “An express being sent by the committee of merchants in this place to acquaint the people of your place that by taking the sense of the inhabitants of this city, a majority was found for importing all articles from Great Britain except those which are dutable.”

Evert Byvanck went to London in 1770, and his partner Abeel wrote him a long letter from New York on 16 January 1771: “The uncertainty of war or peace you know gave us uneasyness when you went away. . . . Must again request you not to send too many goods, knowing the critical situation of affairs as to peace or war.” Although the letterbook ends in April 1771, Abeel remained an avid patriot, and served as a major in the revolution which soon followed.

The mercantile history, to some readers, will be of even greater interest than the machinations over the Stamp Act. The letter book includes several very long and detailed order lists for the finished metalware being imported from England for retail sale in New York. Tools such as hammers and anvils appear frequently, but also great quantities of furniture hardware: cupboard locks, hinges, Chinese handles and much more. The likely market for these goods would be the cabinetmakers of New York, finishing their masterpieces with the latest ornamental hardware from England. Other unusual goods include fish hooks, jew’s harps, mouse traps, pewter candle molds, and razors.

WITH–a small archive of business records of the firm after it was passed on to Garret Abeel’s son Garret Byvanck Abeel (1768-1829). The firm remained active in Abeel family hands under various partnerships through at least the 4th generation by 1915. These later records include:

Expense ledger for mercantile ships. 18 pages, stitched; defective with perhaps 10% of the text area torn away on each page. Each page is related to a separate ship’s voyage, with payments to chandlers, blacksmiths, sailmakers, grocers, advances to crew, and other expenses preparatory to departure. On 20 May 1795, the account lists £16 paid to “the two Negroes who worked their passages” aboard the Brig Diana. July 1794 to January 1796.

Partial daybook of general store sales, [15] pages, stitched. 7 August to 9 October 1806.

A file of 72 receipts, invoices, shipping documents, and promissory notes, 1795-1829.

A file of 38 letters addressed to the firm, 1810-1827. Many of these letters are orders which go into great specificity about the “old sable Russia iron” traded by the Abeels to merchants in the United States and England; others discuss the trade more broadly.

Estimate

$4,000 – $6,000